Day 6: April 10th 2014: local media day!

We spent this morning with the local ITV channel, Channel TV, so we hope to be able to bring you a TV clip on friday. We were joined on site for the interview by the local Connetable or head of the Parish, John Le Maistre, who gave his opinion on the work that we’re carrying out. He felt that it was important that the next generation learns about what happened in their parish, so was supportive of the work, which was nice to hear.  The reporter also asked questions about the camps in Guernsey and Alderney, so I had to tread carefully there, especially with Alderney, as as they’re much more sensitive about their dark history.The cameras also captured Peter doing geo-radar and me trowelling the soil at the base of the entrance post. We were also visited by a reporter from the Jersey Evening Post, who asked about how I got interested in archaeology and the Occupation and wanted to know my motivations for excavating Lager Wick, so I’ll attach the PDF when I have it. The interviews took up much of the morning.

After that, I decided to take the team on a little field trip as a break, so Marek, Peter and I walked down to Fort Henry, on the land of the Royal Golf Club, and visited the 18th century fort (which I had seen yesterday by myself) and checked out the two German bunkers on the coast behind it. They were sealed up, but Marek is keen to see some Jersey bunkers so see how they compare with ones in Norway. Today’s photo is a picture of Peter (on the left) and Marek (on the right) posing by the bunker.

After a nice lunch in Gorey, at the foot of Mount Orgueil castle, we returned to the site so Peter could continue with the geo-radar and Marek and I could wander around the Links Estate opposite the dig, to search for the cement store of the Organisation Todt, to see if the building still stood. Our search was inconclusive but we found a potential candidate built on a concrete base!Image

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About Gilly Carr

I am a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge's Institute of Continuing Education. I work in the field of conflict archaeology and POW archaeology, and my fieldwork is based in the Channel Islands.

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